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TIPS & EXPERT ADVICE ON ESSAYS, PAPERS & COLLEGE APPLICATIONS

 Euclid  was  a  greek  mathematician  who  lived  around  300  b.c  and   lived  in Alexandria  as  stated  by  Luke Mastin  and  should  not  be  confused  with  Euclid  of  Megara.  Euclid  was  one  of  the  most  influential  people  in  the  world  of  geometry,  and  is  even  often  referred  to  as  the  father  of  geometry  according  to  the  article  Euclid,  the  Father  of  Geometry – Greek  Mathematics  and  also  Luke  Mastin.  Throughout  Euclid’s  lifetime,  Euclid  had  many  accomplishments,  not  all  were  in  the  field  of  geometry  but  his  most  notable  one  was,  in  fact  his  most  amazing  accomplishment  was  in  the  field  of  geometry.  Euclid’s  most  amazing  accomplishment  were  the  13  books  he  wrote  called  The  Elements,  and  these  13  books  weren’t  just  any  old  books,  in  fact  these  books  are  so  important  that  Don  Allen  says  “No  other  book  except  the  Bible  has  been  so  widely  translated  and  circulated.”  According  to  math.tamu.edu  this  means  that  there  is  only  one  other  book  in  the  world   more  important  than  the  books  that  Euclid  wrote  and  that’s  the  bible.          The  13  books  Euclid  wrote  were  very  influential  in  many  fields  not  just  geometry  according  to  David  E.  Joyce  who  says  “It  has  influenced  all  branches  of  science  but  none  so  much  as  mathematics  and  the  exact  sciences.”  The  13  books  that  Euclid  wrote  talked  about  multiple  parts  of  math,  four  to  be  exact  and  the  four  that  he  wrote  about  were  plane  geometry  in  books  1-6,  theory  of  numbers  in  book  7-9,  incommensurables  in  book  10  and  finally  solid  geometry  in  books  11-13  according  to  Don  Allen.  Each  of  the  books  that  Euclid  wrote  had  a  lot  of  information  but  the  one  that  I’ll  talk  about  is  the  first  book  and  the  five  postulates  in  the  book.  The  five  postulates  that  I’ll  talk  about  were  created  somewhere  around  2300  years  ago  all  with  just  a  straightedge  and  compass  according  to  Luke  Mastin.          The  first  postulate  Euclid  came  up  with  was  “to  draw  a  straight  line  from  any  point  to  any  point.”  The  way  Euclid  wrote  it  isn’t  to  clear  on  what  the  postulate  means  exactly  but  is  pretty  simple  when  you  actually  understand  what  Euclid  is  saying.  What  Euclid  is  basically  saying  in  this  first  postulate  is  that  when  you  have  multiple  points  you  can  connect  those  points  with  a  straight  line.  Not  only  that  but  the  line  created  connecting  the  two  points  is  unique  as  well  as  the  shortest  distance  between  the  two  points.  What  this  means  is  that  no  matter  what  line  you  create  there  is  no  other  line  that  connects  the  two  points  like  the  one  previously  created.          The  second  postulate  that  Euclid  came  up  with  was  “to  produce  a  finite  straight  line  continuously  in  a  straight  line.”  What  the  postulate  that  Euclid  made  is  taking  a  line  segment  which  is  a  finite  line  and  extending  it  infinitely  which  then  creates  a  plane.  The  second  postulate  doesn’t  really  tell  you  to  much  besides  the  fact  that  you  can  stretch  a  line  segment  infinitely  in  either  direction,  which  is  why  it’s  probably  one  of  the  easiest  of  Euclid’s  postulates  to  follow.  Although  the  postulate  is  simple,  if  you  don’t  understand  what  the  postulate  Is  trying  to  tell  you  and  you’re  confused,  then  you  might  have  trouble  with  the  other  postulates  Euclid  came  up  with.          The  third  postulate  that  Euclid  came  up  with  was  “to  describe  a  circle  with  any  center  and  radius.”  Now  this  is  where  the  way  the  postulate  is  worded  can  make  many  people  confused  but  once  you  know  what  Euclid  was  trying  to  communicate  it  will  seem  so  clear  and  simple.  What  Euclid’s  third  postulate  is  trying  to  say  is  that  given  any  point  and  any  distance  or  radius  you  can  create  a  circle.  Being  confined  to  just  a  regular  compass  and  straightedge  this  can  only  be  done  to  a  certain  extent,  but  if  you  were  able  to  get  your  hands  on  a  bigger  compass  and  straightedge  then  you  would  be  able  to  make  a  bigger  circle  with  the  bigger  compass  and  straightedge.          Second to last we have Euclid’s fourth postulate which anyone can understand with just a basic knowledge of math or equivalence. The postulate that Euclid came up with simply says “That all right angles equal one another.”  

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